Colour mood: Spring!

In these uncertain times of a global crisis, it can sometimes feel as if the whole world has stopped moving. But, it can be reassuring to remember that life goes on, and Mother Nature isn’t on lockdown like the rest of us. You might be stuck indoors but outside, winter is beginning to thaw.  As the temperature softens and spring unfolds, many of us will feel a sense of renewed energy and optimism. And it’s not just the warmer weather and Vitamin D that has our spirits lifting — with those blossoms blooming, skies full of blue, new green foliage on the trees and honey bees buzzing in the morning sun… the world in springtime really is a glorious place to behold! 

The energy and emotional “lift” we feel on a beautiful spring day is a powerful reminder of just how easily affected we are by what we see in the world around us. In particular, the connection between colour and our mood is fascinating. 

Colour is a powerful part of visual communication — used to signal action, influence mood, and even influence physiological reactions. Savvy marketers have been using colour psychology for decades to try and influence consumer behaviour, while medical research has linked certain colours with associated outcomes such as increased blood pressure, increased metabolism, and eyestrain.

 

 Have you ever noticed the instant perk-up you get when wearing a colour you love? Or the feeling of calm when you enter a softly lit yoga studio? This spring, we encourage you to make the most of nature’s gorgeous colour mood and bring a little more pop into your everyday. Maybe add a bright vase of flowers to your desk or dining table, add a new colour to your wardrobe, or buy a new throw rug for your bedroom. You’ll be surprised what an impact on your mood it could have!

Not sure which colours to pick? While the scientific evidence is a little debatable, there are some generally accepted links between colours and emotional response. Here’s a quick rundown: 

Happy colours: Happy colours are bright, warm colours like yellow, orange, pink and red. Pastel colours like peach, light pink or lilac are also thought to have an uplifting effect on your mood.

Energising colours: Highly pigmented, strong colours like royal blue, turquoise, magenta and emerald green can have a stimulating effect and make you feel refreshed and energized. Colours like bright red, bright yellow and neon green can feel energising and make you feel more alert, but can also be irritating on the eyes. These colours will grab your attention and stand out from their surroundings, but it pays to use them with restraint to avoid a negative effect.

Warm colours: Colours in the red area of the colour spectrum are known as warm colours and include red, orange, and yellow. Warm colours often evoke feelings of happiness, optimism and energy. 

Cool colours: Cool colours include green, blue, and purple. Cool colours are usually thought to calm and soothe, but can also express sadness. Purple is often used to help spark creativity as it’s a mixture of blue (calm) and red (intense).